Saturation

The intensity of a color relative to its own brightness. Colours are said to be saturated when they have a strong hue and high intensity.

More terms you might want to know

User Journey Map

A diagram that reflects the processes and steps a user would take when completing a certain task or goal. The User Journey Map also highlights the key activities, touchpoints, stakeholders, and benefits of an experience. In order to develop an effective strategy that helps guide users through the process of reaching their goals and objectives, the User Journey Map provides a comprehensive view of how your customers will navigate towards achieving their goals.

RAW Image

A digital image captured by a digital camera or scanner that has not been processed in any way by the camera software.

Warm Colours

Colours on the same side of the colour wheel as red, such as pink, orange and yellow.

Affordance

Affordances describe a relationship between the environment and an animate object, classified as either positive or negative.

Items, such as a car that leads to movement, have a positive affordance. Things like stairs that lead upwards have a negative affordance because they will not allow for any other form of movement other than up or down if used accordingly.

Zeigarnik Effect

A psychological phenomenon that states that people tend to remember unfinished or interrupted tasks better than completed tasks.

Terminal

The end (straight or curved) of any stroke that doesn’t include a serif. Some typefaces feature ball terminals on letters such as the ‘f’, ‘a’, and ‘c’.

Shade

The relative lightness or darkness of a hue.

Quick Keys or Shortcuts

A Shortcut is a computer function that performs a set of commands to save time. A Quick Key is a keyboard shortcut used to trigger an action.

Bold

A greater typographic weight than the standard typeface, often used to highlight text that the writer wants to emphasise or denote sections, headlines or quotes in printed material.

Bold type is a little heavier than the average type because of its higher contrast, making it more readable. The opposite of bold type is light type, also known as regular or book.

Font Style

Designers and developers use font styles to denote differences in meaning between two or more words, phrases, sentences, paragraphs, or blocks of text. Typical font styles in CSS and web development are normal, italic, oblique and inherit.

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