Vector Graphics

Vector graphics are made up of two sets of points: control points (which determine shape) and anchor points (determining length). Anchor points attach geometry to form a shape like a ball or a heart.

More terms you might want to know

Typesetting

The process of arranging type to make written material readable. The arrangement of type involves decisions about individual letters and words (e.g. line spacing, letter spacing, and word spacing) and more significant page layout decisions (e.g., margins, headline position on the page).

Crop Marks

Also called trim marks, are markings on artwork that tells the printer where to cut the page.

Trim Size

The width and height of a document, after having been cut down to size from a larger sheet.

Stem

The part of a letter, usually a vertical line, that rise above the x-height.

Bold

A greater typographic weight than the standard typeface, often used to highlight text that the writer wants to emphasise or denote sections, headlines or quotes in printed material.

Bold type is a little heavier than the average type because of its higher contrast, making it more readable. The opposite of bold type is light type, also known as regular or book.

Ligature

A form of typographic ornament used by a type designer for decorative purposes. Common ligatures are based on joining two or more letters together, often with figures embedded in the design

Icon

A small picture or design that represents an idea, function, or some other type of visual concept. For example, in computer graphics and web development, an icon is a pictorial representation of a program or file type.

Letterpress

A printing press that uses movable type and punches to make impressions on paper.

Shade

The relative lightness or darkness of a hue.

Hue

A colour that appears to be pure and lacks any lightness (or tone) or saturation.

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