Backslanted

A type of design that features the strokes running predominantly from the upper left to the lower right.

It can also be used in reference to a type of lettering, typically for advertisements, to be read in either direction. It is also used to help the reader navigate through and around the advertisement.

More terms you might want to know

Design Thinking

An iterative process that designers use to understand the user, challenge assumptions, and redefine the problems to identify alternative strategies and solutions that might not be instantly apparent with our initial level of understanding. Design Thinking provides a solution-based approach to solving problems. It is a way of thinking and working as well as a collection of hands-on methods.

Placeholder Text

Text that is used to fill in a gap in a document.

Palette

A set of colors which can be used to create a particular visual effect. It is usually composed of multiple primary, secondary, and tertiary colours.

UX Audit

A discipline that analyses the usability of an application by assessing its interaction design and user experience.

Load More Scrolling

A design technique employed on websites and mobile apps that encourages users to scroll to view additional content.

Card Sorting

A UX design technique in which you divide your users into groups, show them cards with different names for unrelated objects and ask them to categorise them.

Stem

The part of a letter, usually a vertical line, that rise above the x-height.

Design Sprint

A way to create and test designs. Designers use design sprints as a time-intensive method of quickly testing ideas and then pivoting into designing for user needs. A designer may then take the prototype they created on the first day of the design sprint and fix any usability issues with it, which is a quick way to get feedback on their work before continuing development.

Storyboard

A graphical representation of a scenario, usually created and presented in sequence.

Shade

The relative lightness or darkness of a hue.

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