Isolation Effect

A psychological principle which predicts that when multiple homogeneous stimuli are presented, the stimulus which differs from the rest is most likely to be remembered. In other words, people tend to remember items in isolation more than those of a similar nature or objects in clusters. This phenomenon has been applied in designing websites and software with various levels of success.

More terms you might want to know

Point Size

A unit for defining the size of a font. It's not a distance; this unit's measurement is only relative to the typeface's design.

Monochrome

Designs that are created in one colour. It can be any colour, but the whole design will range from light to darker shades. As the name implies, it is typically a single hue, with black and white also being typical combinations for this type of design.

HTML

A language used to create web pages, and it stands for Hypertext Markup Language.

UX Audit

A discipline that analyses the usability of an application by assessing its interaction design and user experience.

Usability Testing

A process in which subjects use a product or service under test conditions and report their experience.

Slab Serif

A type of serif, characterized by large x-heights and thick, blocky strokes with little variation in width.

System Font

A type of font that comes pre-installed in an operating system.

Responsive Design

The process of developing a product or design system that can be altered to fit different device and interaction contexts.

Customer Experience

The sum of all experiences an individual has with a company or its delivery channels during their journey. From handling and registering a complaint to ordering new products, these interactions are monitored and analyzed at every touchpoint by frontline employees, developers, designers, and product managers for improvement opportunities.

Terminal

The end (straight or curved) of any stroke that doesn’t include a serif. Some typefaces feature ball terminals on letters such as the ‘f’, ‘a’, and ‘c’.

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